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Monthly Posts: January 2015

We’re big fans of bench seating. It’s a great choice for a small dining room, creating an eat-in kitchen with limited space, for reading nooks in bedrooms and living rooms, and for getting kids dressed and out the door in small entryways, breezeways, and mudrooms. It can be built into the studs to save you a few inches of floor space, and, bonus!, you can build storage into it for a place to store linens, flatware and silverware that’s used infrequently, even extra cushions for impromptu floor seating. It’s not too hard to roll your own with the right tools. There are plentiful plans available online (like this one: http://ow.ly/G8fc6 ), but if you have something special in mind we’d love to build you a custom solution. Just give us a call!


Built-in Window Seat – Bench Plans
sawdustgirl.com
This is the first plan in the Robin Collection. In Robin's room, this bench is built-in between two bookcases but you could build this plan as a…
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Built-ins are a hallmark of Arts & Crafts style homes, making it possible to pack a lot more living into a smaller space. Here are some classic ideas you’ll see in many of the older neighborhoods around Indy: http://ow.ly/G7QRb


Arts & Crafts Built-Ins
www.myoldhouseonline.com
Discuss restoration projects, how-to advice & great stories with other old house enthusiasts through forums, photos, videos & blogs.
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Whether you have multiple children or not, bunk beds and lofts are great space savers and can create really fun spaces for kids and guests. Here’s a DIY we love that even incorporates a rope ladder. The bed’s not super high, if you’re worried about Jr. taking a topple, and the rail is a good call in any case.
http://www.thehandmadehome.net/2011/08/how-to-build-a-loft/


how to build a loft
www.thehandmadehome.net
a step by step how-to guide, from the posts, to the ladder, and even the fabric underneath.
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If you suffer from lack of kitchen counter space you have to first ask “what can I take off the counters?” When we looked around we found we did not actually need the following things on our counters:
*Toaster oven—rarely used and a toaster takes up far less space. Gone.
*Blender, rice cooker, and food processor. Actually, we use all of these things on a fairly regular basis, but they are all light enough to be stored on a shelf off the counter in an out of the way place, taken out as needed, and put away after use.
*Dish-drying rack—We installed under counter racks for drying stemware. An absorbent mat lies beneath it, and we do handwash and air dry some things, but we found that getting rid of the rack meant we were more diligent about putting away dishes.
*Knife-block. Not only does a magnetic strip from IKEA store things off the counter, it’s actually far more sanitary.
*Spice Rack—wall-hung spice shelves cost next to nothing and made spices actually easier to find because they’re now at eye level.

http://ow.ly/FWmOM


5 Ways to Find More Counter Space
www.thekitchn.com
Last week, I revisited some of our Kitchen Tours to look at extra counter space added by way of islands, carts, and tables. But, some of you asked,…
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We have yet to meet a bungalow with a coat closet. Thousands of residents of Indianapolis’s urban neighborhoods have a perpetual pile of coats, gloves, and hats laying over a chair or loveseat in their living room or stacked on a groaning coat rack from November through April. Consider enclosing a seldom used open or three-season porch and using part of that space for a mud room. We’ve done something similar in our own Garfield Park home, complete with shelves for individual family members to house their hats and gloves, a built-in bench where you can sit down and remove wet and road salt-laden footwear, and hooks for hanging jackets and book bags.


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Buyers sometimes pass on older homes because they don’t offer miles of kitchen counter space, coat closets, and spacious bedrooms. We say it’s what you do with the space you have that makes a home livable and pleasant. A smaller home in an older neighborhood also means lower taxes, city amenities in walking distance, and less to clean and maintain, not to mention solid framing, which is hit or miss in lots of newer subdivisions. So this week we’ll take a look at some solutions we've implemented to solve for less space.
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One of our favorite things to do in a bathroom gut. If you're planning to put down ceramic, marble, or stone, consider spending just a little extra for a heated floor. This is a pic from an employee's bathroom remodel. Wow does that feel good under foot first thing in the morning. As a bonus, her 11 year old Yellow Lab mix loves it too.


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